Proteomics for precision medicine: Next-generation testing to indicate future cardiovascular risk and improve outcomes

Proteomics for precision medicine: Next-generation testing to
indicate future cardiovascular risk and improve outcomes

Proteomic testing can reveal multiple answers to clinical questions that allow providers to better predict, monitor, and prevent the escalation of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This allows providers to move the needle away from the practice of late-stage treatment and toward treating at-risk patients sooner and before a major cardiovascular (CV) event.

Topics covered include:

  • The capabilities of proteomics
  • How comprehensive protein detection technology can accurately predict major cardiovascular events
  • How proteomic testing can ultimately improve outcomes

Image of Nelson Trujillo, MD

Nelson Trujillo, MD

Cardiologist
Boulder Heart at Anderson Medical Center

Image of Rosalynn Gill, PhD

Rosalyn Gill, PhD

Vice President, Medical Affairs
SomaLogic, Inc.

Image of Todd Johnson EVP SomaLogic

Todd Johnson

Executive Vice President, Diagnostics
Business Unit
SomaLogic, Inc.

Proteomics for precision medicine: Next-generation testing to indicate future cardiovascular risk and improve outcomes

A presentation by Nelson Trujillo, MD, Rosalyn Gill, PhD, and Todd Johnson

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