Developing microbiome-directed therapeutics for treating childhood undernutrition

Using multiomic methods, including SomaScan® proteomics, to judge clinical efficacy

Abstract

This 1-hour talk covers how researchers are testing the hypothesis that perturbations in the normal development of the gut microbiome are causally related to childhood undernutrition, a devastating global health problem whose long-term sequelae include metabolic and immune dysfunction, stunting, and neurodevelopmental abnormalities, which remains largely refractory to current therapeutic interventions.

Learning objectives

This 1-hour talk covers how researchers are testing the hypothesis that perturbations in the normal development of the gut microbiome are causally related to childhood undernutrition, a devastating global health problem whose long-term sequelae include metabolic and immune dysfunction, stunting, and neurodevelopmental abnormalities, which remains largely refractory to current therapeutic interventions.

  • Understand evidence that impaired postnatal development of the gut microbiota is causally related to childhood undernutrition
  • Understand how preclinical gnotobiotic animal models can be used to develop new microbiota-directed therapeutics
  • Understand how multiomic methods, including SomaScan proteomics, can be used to judge the efficacy and mechanism of action of these therapeutics in clinical studies

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Jeffrey Gordon, MD

Director, Edison Family Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Washington University

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Michael J. Barratt, PhD

Executive Director, Center for Gut Microbiome and Nutrition Research, Washington University

 

Developing microbiome-directed therapeutics for treating childhood undernutrition

A webinar presented by Jeffrey Gordon, MD, and Michael J. Barratt, PhD

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