Developing microbiome-directed therapeutics for treating childhood undernutrition

Using Multiomic Methods, Including SomaScan® Proteomics, to Judge Clinical Efficacy

Abstract

This 1-hour talk covers how researchers are testing the hypothesis that perturbations in the normal development of the gut microbiome are causally related to childhood undernutrition, a devastating global health problem whose long-term sequelae include metabolic and immune dysfunction, stunting, and neurodevelopmental abnormalities, which remains largely refractory to current therapeutic interventions.

learning Objectives

This 1-hour talk covers how researchers are testing the hypothesis that perturbations in the normal development of the gut microbiome are causally related to childhood undernutrition, a devastating global health problem whose long-term sequelae include metabolic and immune dysfunction, stunting, and neurodevelopmental abnormalities, which remains largely refractory to current therapeutic interventions.

  • Understand evidence that impaired postnatal development of the gut microbiota is causally related to childhood undernutrition
  • Understand how preclinical gnotobiotic animal models can be used to develop new microbiota-directed therapeutics
  • Understand how multiomic methods, including SomaScan proteomics, can be used to judge the efficacy and mechanism of action of these therapeutics in clinical studies

Jeffery Gordon, MD

Director, Edison Family Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Washington University

Michael J. Barratt, PhD

Executive Director, Center for Gut Microbiome and Nutrition Research, Washington University

Developing microbiome-directed therapeutics for treating childhood undernutrition

A webinar presented by Jeffery Gordon, MD, and Michael J. Barratt, PhD

Request Information

Share This Post