Detect biomarkers associated with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)

Using the SomaScan® Assay to identify new biomarkers in liver disease

Abstract

In this 1-hour discussion, learn how the SomaScan Assay can be used to detect biomarkers associated with NAFLD—specifically, the identification of circulating proteins associated with fibrosis in NAFLD using a custom 5k-plex SomaScan Assay. Also discussed is the importance of identifying non-invasive biomarkers that improve clinical decision-making and drug development for NAFLD, and the strategies for multiplexed validation of candidate biomarkers discovered using the SomaScan Assay.

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Kathleen Corey, MD, MPH, MMSc

Director of the Massachusetts General Hospital NAFLD program and an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School

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Rebecca Pitts

Principal scientist at the Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research in Cambridge, Massachusetts

 

Advancing biomarkers for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease using proteomics

A webinar presented by Kathleen Corey, MD, MPH, MMSc, and Rebecca Pitts


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